Throughout the entire existence of the bicycle, inventors have been trying to devise a comfortable platform on which to sit when operating one of the many varieties of the upright machines. It seems a central focus has been the elimination of the nose of the saddle.
It doesn’t take much imagination to realize that a saddle without a nose might crack the comfort code but there’s a problem – the nose isn’t as useless as to be cast aside cavalierly. Quite the contrary, the nose provides a steering and stabilizing device that can be quite useful to the skilled rider. Some might argue differently, but I’ll defend the saddle nose as something to hang on to.
In the interest of our readers, I’ve tried many alternative saddles since 1994. The verdict on each one has varied from acceptable to downright laughable. The RideOut Carbon Comfort approaches the problem of discomfort differently, and, finally I’m sold on a non-standard saddle. Much of the reason is because the Carbon Comfort actually has a nose. It may be reduced in size and less prominent than on a standard saddle, but it’s there. Significantly, though, the reduced size does eliminate much of the numbness caused by standard-length saddle noses. But’s that not the only reason the Carbon Comfort is so effective. Equally important are the dimensions of the saddle. At 6.75 inches long and 8.75 inches wide, the platform provides excellent area on which your weight can be spread, alleviating pressure on the perineal nerve, which is often the cause of discomfort and numbness (and some say sexual dysfunction) when riding. In addition each side of the Carbon Comfort is raised allowing even less pressure on the perineal nerve while allowing air flow, which also adds a degree of comfort on long rides.
Admittedly, it took a bit of getting used to, but after a week or so of using the Carbon Comfort, I’ve decided to leave it on my touring bike.
At 13.4 ounces (380 grams), and with the Kevlar reinforced cover, the Carbon Comfort offers an excellent option for those who might like to try something a bit different to sit on when riding a standard upright bike.

By Mike Deme, Editor, Adventure Cyclist editor@adventurecycling.org

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